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Pregnancy Pregnancy

How to be a good little girl, per the hospital. I'm not a good girl. *** UPDATE

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UPDATED INFO FOR THOSE WHO HAVE MISREAD **** I never said I know more than my doctor.

I EXPECT informed consent to be a requirement before any procedure, just like any other thing you go to the hospital for. They tell you the options the ones they like, the ones they don't like, risks and benefits and I get to choose. THEY EDUCATE, I CHOOSE.

If anyone wants to go on faith and blindly accept anything they want, that is fine I won't stop you. That is your business. You get your choices, I get mine.

I might wear the stupid hospital gown, but I don't want to be bullied into it. I don't know what I will feel most comfortable in, until I get there. But it is really funny that some think  that bulling is ok in the hospital, but not in school's?


My dr wanted me to go in today to L&D to get an NST because he thinks I am 42 weeks, I think that I am 39 weeks. Late ultrasounds vs LMP. Did NST Thursday, Tues, Thursday, today on Sunday, and then have appt to go back on Tuesday. So we have done this for a while. I don't think they are really needed, I am just going along with some of his wishes. I have told him NO on induction. Just keeping the peace really going along with the NST's.

While at the hospital they give me a pamphlet on how to be a good patient.

Admission. Upon arrival to the childbirth suite you will be INSTRUCTED to change into a hospital gown ... A vaginal exam will be done to see if your cervix is ready for the baby to come.
It says not to worry we are assessing your baby continuously. IE STAY IN BED WITH THE NST MONITORS ON AT ALL TIMES.

You are staying to deliver your baby. IV fluids WILL BE STARTED in your hand or arm. This will help in the prevention of dehydration and/or low blood sugar.

Can I eat or drink? While you are in active labor most physicians WILL ONLY ALLOW clear liquids and ice.

Vaginal Delivery. When your cervix if fully dilated you WILL BE INSTRUCTED to start pushing....If the baby appears healthy and is breathing well, he may be placed on your stomach.

I was asked if I had any instructions for the nursery. I said I didn't plan on my child going to the nursery. THE BABY CAN'T BE IN YOUR ROOM UNLESS SOMEONE IS AWAKE is what I was told. Hubby said I will be here and be awake if she isn't.

I think me being comfortable, wearing what I want because I am not sick, being able to move is going to do more to progress my labor than you hooking me to a useless machine for the duration. Laying on my back in pain not moving isn't going to fly. You might get 20 mins. Might. I sure am not allowing you to start a non medically needed IV, I am giving birth I am not SICK. I will prevent dehydration and low blood sugar the old fashioned way. And I am pretty sure I will know when I need to push. Why do you believe that my cervix is just yours to grope as you please? I mean really the baby is going to come regardless if you check or not. PS you have no rights over my child and where he will be. He needs to come to me immediately. You don't get to tell me how soon I can see him or when I get to have him in my room. He is MINE. He will be with a parent at all times. (he has an umbilical cord and if anything is wrong, you need to leave it intact to allow you time to work on him vs detaching him from his built in life support)

It is silly in this day and age that hospitals think they get to dictate your birth. They use words to make it sound like you have no options. I didn't bother addressing any of this today. No need to start issues early. But Hubby is like wait a min who do they think they are. You can ask, you can suggest, you don't get to demand. Too bad home births are not legal in my state. But after today, Hubby FULLY understands why you would not want to get to the hospital early.




by on Oct. 7, 2012 at 4:15 PM
Replies (511-520):
Sharkgirl7
by on Oct. 10, 2012 at 9:51 PM

is there a reason why you quoted me but then didn't reply??

Quoting jaylonsmommy26:


Quoting Sharkgirl7:

I'm sorry that you are uneducated on this issue =(

Quoting jaylonsmommy26:

They have a reason for doing things  that way. That have been to school for years for this, they know what they are doing. It may seem they are being pushy, but every step they take is a protective measure for your child. If you can't trust them, you need to find another hospital or you will have a miserable birth.




MsDenuninani
by on Oct. 10, 2012 at 9:53 PM


Quoting gumeshoe:

They are so efficient that it leads to failure to wait, which they call failure to progress. Then to pit then to a min 30 % csection rate. And the Dr is home in time for dinner.

Too efficient in getting women in surgery.

Quoting MsDenuninani:

Money is a valid point.

But convenience -- convenience is important too. Efficiency matters in a hospital -- and efficiency, as a principal, saves lives.  It's not just about emergencies -- it's about systematically getting to more people necessary measures.

I'm not trying to tell you that you're wrong to want what you want.  All I'm saying is that the hospital is its own ecosystem, and you exist inside of it for the time you're there.  Second-guessing them seems silly when you are not the expert. 

But you are completely right in that you have choices.

 


Only if you think surgery is bad. 

Look - it's to give control of the process to doctors.  I'm not going to argue with that.

But healthcare has been largely about getting control over "natural" processes.  

Hell, that's what birth control is.

You want to put a value judgment on hospitals?  Go ahead. 

I am too.

orangeshirt
by on Oct. 10, 2012 at 10:07 PM
I was speaking specifically about inductions and surgical births which are done for reasons that are not medically indicated, but rather to make the process less unpredictable and less inefficient than it naturally is. Reasons such as being "overdue" or "baby is too big" or "mother's pelvis is too small" or "baby is malpositioned" or "baby is stuck". Fabricated diagnoses such as failure to progress or fetal distress, both of which can be avoided by not only denying medical interventions but also refusing to do most of the things listed in the OPs pamphlet.


Quoting MsDenuninani:



Quoting orangeshirt:

Labor is, by nature, an inefficient process that can last days. Forcing it to be more efficient doesn't save lives.


 


In an isolated instance, perhaps.  In 98% of the time, perhaps.


But in some percentage -- it just might.  Particularly if you have many doctors, many patients, and one place, and things need to be done in the best way possible. 


(An inducement, by the way, absolutely saved my life, and my baby's.  I'm an isolated example, I'm sure.  But a life saved nonetheless. )


Posted on CafeMom Mobile
orangeshirt
by on Oct. 10, 2012 at 10:13 PM
Not only do many women agree that a surgical birth rate of 30-35% is bad, the World Health Organization agrees. We have been challenged to lower it to 15% and it continued to rise. They amended their challenge to 20% and we still fail. More surgeries does not equal better outcomes. After much research and studying worldwide trends, the WHO determined that 15-20% is the tipping point. Stay below that line and outcomes improve, go above and outcomes decline.

Surgery is good when needed. A vast majority of women do not need it, no matter what lies they are told.

ETA what other natural processes do surgeons involve themselves with? Birth control is something a woman seeks out of her own accord and takes voluntarily to have control over her body. It has nothing to do healthcare wanting to control her body.

Quoting MsDenuninani:



Quoting gumeshoe:


They are so efficient that it leads to failure to wait, which they call failure to progress. Then to pit then to a min 30 % csection rate. And the Dr is home in time for dinner.


Too efficient in getting women in surgery.


Quoting MsDenuninani:


Money is a valid point.


But convenience -- convenience is important too. Efficiency matters in a hospital -- and efficiency, as a principal, saves lives.  It's not just about emergencies -- it's about systematically getting to more people necessary measures.


I'm not trying to tell you that you're wrong to want what you want.  All I'm saying is that the hospital is its own ecosystem, and you exist inside of it for the time you're there.  Second-guessing them seems silly when you are not the expert. 


But you are completely right in that you have choices.


 



Only if you think surgery is bad. 


Look - it's to give control of the process to doctors.  I'm not going to argue with that.


But healthcare has been largely about getting control over "natural" processes.  


Hell, that's what birth control is.


You want to put a value judgment on hospitals?  Go ahead. 


I am too.



Posted on CafeMom Mobile
MsDenuninani
by on Oct. 10, 2012 at 10:17 PM


Quoting orangeshirt:

I was speaking specifically about inductions and surgical births which are done for reasons that are not medically indicated, but rather to make the process less unpredictable and less inefficient than it naturally is. Reasons such as being "overdue" or "baby is too big" or "mother's pelvis is too small" or "baby is malpositioned" or "baby is stuck". Fabricated diagnoses such as failure to progress or fetal distress, both of which can be avoided by not only denying medical interventions but also refusing to do most of the things listed in the OPs pamphlet.


Quoting MsDenuninani:

 


Quoting orangeshirt:

Labor is, by nature, an inefficient process that can last days. Forcing it to be more efficient doesn't save lives.


 


In an isolated instance, perhaps.  In 98% of the time, perhaps.


But in some percentage -- it just might.  Particularly if you have many doctors, many patients, and one place, and things need to be done in the best way possible. 


(An inducement, by the way, absolutely saved my life, and my baby's.  I'm an isolated example, I'm sure.  But a life saved nonetheless. )



Makes sense.  I was speaking more broadly about policies and procedures in a hospital that have been developed over time and through experience.  I'm not interested in second guessing anyone here, hospital, or the OP.

orangeshirt
by on Oct. 10, 2012 at 10:21 PM
It's important to remember that these policies haven't evolved over a long period of time. Birth didn't make a big shift to hospitals until the mid twentieth century and since then it has taken on many forms. These practices aren't tried and true in any long-term sense.


Quoting MsDenuninani:



Quoting orangeshirt:

I was speaking specifically about inductions and surgical births which are done for reasons that are not medically indicated, but rather to make the process less unpredictable and less inefficient than it naturally is. Reasons such as being "overdue" or "baby is too big" or "mother's pelvis is too small" or "baby is malpositioned" or "baby is stuck". Fabricated diagnoses such as failure to progress or fetal distress, both of which can be avoided by not only denying medical interventions but also refusing to do most of the things listed in the OPs pamphlet.



Quoting MsDenuninani:


 



Quoting orangeshirt:

Labor is, by nature, an inefficient process that can last days. Forcing it to be more efficient doesn't save lives.



 



In an isolated instance, perhaps.  In 98% of the time, perhaps.



But in some percentage -- it just might.  Particularly if you have many doctors, many patients, and one place, and things need to be done in the best way possible. 



(An inducement, by the way, absolutely saved my life, and my baby's.  I'm an isolated example, I'm sure.  But a life saved nonetheless. )




Makes sense.  I was speaking more broadly about policies and procedures in a hospital that have been developed over time and through experience.  I'm not interested in second guessing anyone here, hospital, or the OP.


Posted on CafeMom Mobile
MsDenuninani
by on Oct. 10, 2012 at 10:34 PM


Quoting orangeshirt:

Not only do many women agree that a surgical birth rate of 30-35% is bad, the World Health Organization agrees. We have been challenged to lower it to 15% and it continued to rise. They amended their challenge to 20% and we still fail. More surgeries does not equal better outcomes. After much research and studying worldwide trends, the WHO determined that 15-20% is the tipping point. Stay below that line and outcomes improve, go above and outcomes decline.

Surgery is good when needed. A vast majority of women do not need it, no matter what lies they are told.

ETA what other natural processes do surgeons involve themselves with? Birth control is something a woman seeks out of her own accord and takes voluntarily to have control over her body. It has nothing to do healthcare wanting to control her body.

 

I don't know -- I'm not a surgeon.  Maybe surgical skin grafts, as a method of speeding up the natural healing pocess?  I really don't know.

My point is that health care -- particularly lots of reproductive health care -- has been about taking control over something generally considered "natural."  And a woman can refuse a c-section (I hope), as she can birth control, and do things naturally. 

I feel like I'm getting into one of those "the birthing process has been taken over by doctors and hospitals" arguments, which was never my intention.    From my perspective, I pay doctors for their training and expertise and I expect them to use it.  I see your point, but it still feels to narrow to me as a justification for what is, in my personal view, the overall dismissive nature of the OP's post.  

SaphiraJFire
by New Member on Oct. 10, 2012 at 10:44 PM

I agree with most of what your saying but some of it is just pure crud. A few things you mention are you just throwing your weight around.

Jaybo
by on Oct. 11, 2012 at 12:47 AM


Quoting orangeshirt:

I was speaking specifically about inductions and surgical births which are done for reasons that are not medically indicated, but rather to make the process less unpredictable and less inefficient than it naturally is. Reasons such as being "overdue" or "baby is too big" or "mother's pelvis is too small" or "baby is malpositioned" or "baby is stuck". Fabricated diagnoses such as failure to progress or fetal distress, both of which can be avoided by not only denying medical interventions but also refusing to do most of the things listed in the OPs pamphlet.


Quoting MsDenuninani:

 


Quoting orangeshirt:

Labor is, by nature, an inefficient process that can last days. Forcing it to be more efficient doesn't save lives.


 


In an isolated instance, perhaps.  In 98% of the time, perhaps.


But in some percentage -- it just might.  Particularly if you have many doctors, many patients, and one place, and things need to be done in the best way possible. 


(An inducement, by the way, absolutely saved my life, and my baby's.  I'm an isolated example, I'm sure.  But a life saved nonetheless. )



Do you have any idea of what you might be doing? What if even one mother to be reading this thread, takes what you say about fabricated diagnoses as being the truth, refuses medical intervention & she or her baby dies as a result? 

It's all fine and dandy you believe you're more of an expert on childbirth than any member of the medical profession, but when you blatantly push your "expert advice" as being the only advice to follow, you have crossed the line.    

tyheamma
by on Oct. 11, 2012 at 2:43 AM

If the baby is in distress, I understand the medical interference. I've lived that experience. Otherwise, I tend to agree with you. If and when I get pregnant again, I will be eating during my labor. Denying someone with sugar and protein balancing issues food for 17+ hours is cruel. Yes, eating has side effects. I'll agree to be honest and they can agree to deal with whatever arises.

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