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To the lady having the c-section tomorrow solely for the size of the baby...

Posted by on Jan. 1, 2013 at 11:25 PM
  • 11 Replies
3 moms liked this

Here is the ACOG guideline on suspected fetal macrosomia (big baby) for your consideration. I don't know if your providers are acting in accord with the ACOG guidelines or not. I do not know your circumstance, but I **DO** want you have the best care offered in this country and I do want your providers to act on the best evidence available, for your safety and that of your baby! I know, everyone in the group wishes you the VERY VERY BEST no matter what you decide is safest for you and baby! *hug* We are very excited to read your birth story and see pictures once he is born! : ) Take care, dear!!!! : )

http://www.aafp.org/afp/2001/0701/p169.html


"Weighing the newborn after delivery is the only way to accurately diagnose macrosomia [big baby], because the prenatal diagnostic methods (assessment of maternal risk factors, clinical examination and ultrasonographic measurement of the fetus) remain imprecise." This means that there is NO WAY of knowing how much baby will weigh until he or she is weighed after birth!

"Nonetheless, the results of these reports, along with published cost-effectiveness data, do not support prophylactic cesarean delivery for suspected fetal macrosomia with estimated weights of less than 5,000 g (11 lb), although some authors agree that cesarean delivery in these situations should be considered." This means, c-section should not even come up for discussion, unless the is estimated to weigh more than eleven pounds and it is debatable whether a c-section for a estimated baby over eleven is even beneficial.

"Suspected fetal macrosomia is not an indication for induction of labor, because induction does not improve maternal or fetal outcomes." Inducing should not happen, becuase it is not safer for mom or baby. 

"Labor and vaginal delivery are not contraindicated for women with estimated fetal weights up to 5,000 g in the absence of maternal diabetes." A baby estimated to be ELEVEN pounds or less is not a reason to deliver vaginally. 

"With an estimated fetal weight more than 4,500 g, a prolonged second stage of labor or arrest of descent in the second stage is an indication for cesarean delivery." It is safe to have a trial of labor and if it doesn't work THEN take action. 

"Suspected fetal macrosomia is not a contraindication to attempted vaginal birth after a previous cesarean delivery."You can still VBAC with a "big baby"!

by on Jan. 1, 2013 at 11:25 PM
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Replies (1-10):
TTC2Long
by on Jan. 1, 2013 at 11:26 PM
Bump!
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Heather2001
by on Jan. 1, 2013 at 11:33 PM
1 mom liked this

Yes, great info!  My doctors predicted my first baby being 10.5 lbs.  She came out at 9 - natural, no problems.

aussiechic
by on Jan. 1, 2013 at 11:37 PM

bump!!!

Cheyennesmommy4
by Christina on Jan. 1, 2013 at 11:37 PM

BUMP!

ToriBabe1221
by on Jan. 1, 2013 at 11:38 PM
Bump
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Cynthje
by on Jan. 1, 2013 at 11:39 PM

Bump!

cali_angel_girl
by Amy on Jan. 1, 2013 at 11:43 PM

In the long run I think she needs what she feels is best for her however if I we're in her situation I would at least try giving birth vaginally because my son was 9 pounds 12 ounces at birth and I am also on the small side and deliverd him with no problems.

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louzannalady
by on Jan. 1, 2013 at 11:48 PM
1 mom liked this

I agree! I wish her all the very best in the world, no matter what she decides! I just hope this info reaches her and she is confident in her decision. And that, no matter what she and baby are safe! 

Quoting cali_angel_girl:

In the long run I think she needs what she feels is best for her however if I we're in her situation I would at least try giving birth vaginally because my son was 9 pounds 12 ounces at birth and I am also on the small side and deliverd him with no problems.


angela84
by on Jan. 2, 2013 at 12:16 AM

I totally agree with you. Their estimates are based off of the fact that they can be wrong by about 2 pounds give or take!

doulala
by on Jan. 2, 2013 at 12:26 AM

Yes--

And I had concerns because I believe she'd said she wants what is safest-healthiest, yet has no medical need for a cesarean (which comes with much more dangerous risks than natural birthing).   
I was wondering if she had Informed Consent & had interviewed the options,  --and been told how she can easily labor with a huge baby more safely.
    ?

Quoting louzannalady:

I agree! I wish her all the very best in the world, no matter what she decides! I just hope this info reaches her and she is confident in her decision. And that, no matter what she and baby are safe! 

Quoting cali_angel_girl:

In the long run I think she needs what she feels is best for her however if I we're in her situation I would at least try giving birth vaginally because my son was 9 pounds 12 ounces at birth and I am also on the small side and deliverd him with no problems.

If you don't know your options, you don't have any.           ~Korte & Scaer

Mothers need to know that their care and their choices won't be compromised by birth politics.                                                                                            ~Jennifer Rosenberg

Midwives see birth as a miracle and only mess with it if there's a problem;
doctors see birth as a problem and if they don't mess with it, it's a miracle!     
~Barbara Harper

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