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Breastfeeding game plan

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Does breastfeeding makes you hungry or extra tired?
What was your game plan when it comes to breastfeding baby? For example:
When baby is awake and hungry=breastfeed
When baby is asleep=pump milk?
When baby is awake but not hungry=pump milk?
At what time did you rest?
by on Aug. 2, 2013 at 5:44 PM
Replies (11-20):
SASSYCJB
by on Aug. 3, 2013 at 12:43 AM
1 mom liked this
lmao good luck with that

Quoting kelly617:

I noticed I was really thirsty when breastfeeding...not so much extra hungry but thirsty ALL the time

My game plan is to mix in "sleep training" with breastfeeding...I've been reading up and apparently with my first son I set myself up for failure with the way I fed/played/put him to sleep
During the day I'm gonna wake him up every 2hrs. Feed him first, THEN play with him so he doesnt' associate full tummy with going to bed (because then he'll only sleep after eating) then change him and then let him fall back into a nap for 2hrs
then at night I won't wake him up and supposedly that will set his lil internal clock so he'll know when to sleep
Hopefully it'll work!

I made the mistake with my first that I would let him fall asleep right after a nursing or bottle and even now at 20 months he still needs a bottle to fall asleep...it sucks

OH and as soon as baby is done nursing I'm going to pump to try and promote as much milk as possible...I had a problem with low supply as soon as I went back to work last time so I'd rather deal with oversupply than not enough

GOOD LUCK!!!

ninastone
by on Aug. 3, 2013 at 12:52 AM
1 mom liked this

It makes me a bit more hungry, MUCH more thirsty and I was always tired at first (but that is having a newborn). 

The best plan (IMO) is feed baby when they are hungry, directly from the breast. No pumps required! Learn to cosleep with your little one, and rest that way. If you are not comfortable cosleeping you can at least learn to nurse lying down and rest. Baby will nurse when hungry, whether awake or asleep. My son nurses 3-4 times a night and never wakes. 

Good luck!

MentorMom1
by on Aug. 3, 2013 at 12:54 AM
5 moms liked this

 I was a mom for the first time at 24. I had a college degree and had never, ever, in my entire life seen anyone breastfeed a baby.  In fact, I thought breasts were vestigial organs, like the appendix, and no longer served a practical function for modern man. 

Then one day after I got home from work, with my little baby bump growing in front of me, my sweet husband said, "How are you going to feed the baby?" 

I had no idea what he was talking about. "Bottles," I told him.

He told me his mother had breastfed him, and that maybe I could get a book about it.

And being a curious person, I did. The little blue hardback I pulled off the library shelf was the original La Leche League manual, The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding. (You can still find them!)

I lay across our bed and wept. For the first time in my life I realized breastfeeding is the natural way to feed a baby. You just feed the baby when he or she nuzzles your breast, and the baby is comforted not only by the milk, but from all the holding and cuddling in his mother's arms.

I couldn't believe it. Babies need their mothers! It was quite a revelation. 

The most important thing I learned from that book is that to be successful at breastfeeding, you just need to take everything in stride and relax. No need to pump (unless there are special circumstances or you're going back to work). If the baby is sleeping, you should sleep or rest, too. That is what new moms need to do - forget about the dust bunnies. And when the baby wakes up, he will be hungry - as long as you don't supplement with any formula. No need for water, either. It's natural for moms to keep their babies near, to carry them in their arms, and to sleep safely next to them. It puts you into complete synchrony with the baby. The baby's breathing is in synch with yours. He relaxes and grows. 

And there's a symbiotic relationship between mother and baby. The baby needs the milk, which is the perfect infant food, and the mother needs to have her breasts relieved. If you just let the baby take what he needs, and don't pump, you will make the exact right amount . When he goes through a growth spurt and fusses more, just put him to the breast more and you will make more. It's the law of supply and demand.

To ensure a healthy milk supply, remember that closeness triggers the right hormones. Take the baby with you when you go out. Put him in a front pack and not a hard carrier with a handle. This is for attachment.  When you keep your baby close all the time, and do lots of touching, stroking, etc. you will make plenty of milk and have a happy baby.

You just eat when you are hungry - I ate more, for sure, and the pregnancy weight still came off fast. Eat healthy foods, some extra protein, and drink lots of water.  

It's just not as hard as people make it out to be. The first few days you will be engorged. So just use warm compresses and get lots of rest. Keep nursing. Then everything will even out, the engorgement subsides, and you will feel great. 

You don't need a game plan. Nature will take care of everything. All you need to do is open up to loving your baby. Your baby and you will get on the same wavelength. And you both will do great. Don't overthink it. Breastfeeding is one of those natural things that if you try to plan it out, it doesn't help. Your body and the baby will know what to do. Follow your instincts.






lovemymini
by on Aug. 3, 2013 at 1:05 AM
1 mom liked this

I breast fed on demand and would pump excess, I had a lot of milk and it was painful to wait in between feelings.  It made me tired. 

ImNotKarl
by on Aug. 3, 2013 at 1:36 AM
1 mom liked this

I don't know if it's the nursing itself that makes me tired, or the fact that I can't get much sleep, but I'm exhausted. 

I wasn't hungry the first couple of weeks, and I'm not going to lie, the first 2 weeks were super hard and I almost gave up because it's so uncomfortable and I was so tired, but after that it gets easier, and now I'm hungry ALL. THE. TIME. I've also dropped all of my pregnancy weight, and my baby is only 4 weeks old. I eat a lot more than I used to.

I planned to exclusively breasfeed, no pumping, any time my baby woke up rooting. I also let her comfort nurse. I rest whenever I can. When she's sleeping in the early morning, usually. But really if I was able, I'd just sleep when she does.

I am NOT Karl. But I might still eat your hands.

marihla
by on Aug. 3, 2013 at 1:58 AM
1 mom liked this

Breastfeeding makes me instantly thirsty. I didn't notice extra hunger and I'm pretty sure every mom will say she's tired ;)

Game-plan: BF on demand, every time the baby cried in the first few months, I whipped out my boob. After that I learned her cues for when she is hungry (still pretty much BF every hour when she's awake - 10mo) Never used a pump

I started to think of her feeding times as my forced resting stops. Sometimes I would nap with her, just pull her into the bed with me and we slept all cuddled up. 

*sigh* I love breastfeeding. It was super stressful at first but it's so wonderful now.

GodsAmiga
by Silver Member on Aug. 3, 2013 at 2:14 AM
1 mom liked this

It never made me tired and I had no plan. I fed/feed on demand and I never pump unless I'm going to be gone and my dh is watching the baby. :-)

KPJ
by on Aug. 3, 2013 at 2:32 AM
1 mom liked this
I love it! Thank you so much! :)


Quoting MentorMom1:

 I was a mom for the first time at 24. I had a college degree and had never, ever, in my entire life seen anyone breastfeed a baby.  In fact, I thought breasts were vestigial organs, like the appendix, and no longer served a practical function for modern man. 

Then one day after I got home from work, with my little baby bump growing in front of me, my sweet husband said, "How are you going to feed the baby?" 

I had no idea what he was talking about. "Bottles," I told him.

He told me his mother had breastfed him, and that maybe I could get a book about it.

And being a curious person, I did. The little blue hardback I pulled off the library shelf was the original La Leche League manual, The Womanly Art of Breastfeeding. (You can still find them!)

I lay across our bed wept. For the first time in my life I realized breastfeeding is the natural way to feed a baby. You just feed the baby when he or she nuzzles your breast, and the baby is comforted not only by the milk, but from all the holding and cuddling in his mother's arms.

I couldn't believe it. Babies need their mothers! It was quite a revelation. 

The most important thing I learned from that book is that to be successful at breastfeeding, you just need to take everything in stride and relax. No need to pump (unless there are special circumstances or you're going back to work). If the baby is sleeping, you should sleep or rest, too. That is what new moms need to do - forget about the dust bunnies. And when the baby wakes up, he will be hungry - as long as you don't supplement with any formula. No need for water, either. It's natural for moms to keep their babies near, to carry them in their arms, and to sleep safely next to them. It puts you into complete synchrony with the baby. The baby's breathing is in synch with yours. He relaxes and grows. 

And there's a symbiotic relationship between mother and baby. The baby needs the milk, which is the perfect infant food, and the mother needs to have her breasts relieved. If you just let the baby take what he needs, and don't pump, you will make the exact right amount . When he goes through a growth spurt and fusses more, just put him to the breast more and you will make more. It's the law of supply and demand.

To ensure a healthy milk supply, remember that closeness triggers the right hormones. Take the baby with you when you go out. Put him in a front pack and not a hard carrier with a handle. This is for attachment.  When you keep your baby close all the time, and do lots of touching, stroking, etc. you will make plenty of milk and have a happy baby.

You just eat when you are hungry - I ate more, for sure, and the pregnancy weight still came off fast. Eat healthy foods, some extra protein, and drink lots of water.  

It's just not as hard as people make it out to be. The first few days you will be engorged. So just use warm compresses and get lots of rest. Keep nursing. Then everything will even out, the engorgement subsides, and you will feel great. 

You don't need a game plan. Nature will take care of everything. All you need to do is open up to loving your baby. Your baby and you will get on the same wavelength. And you both will do great. Don't overthink it. Breastfeeding is one of those natural things that if you try to plan it out, it doesn't help. Your body and the baby will know what to do. Follow your instincts.


 



 


sugarcrisp
by Silver Member on Aug. 3, 2013 at 3:10 AM
1 mom liked this

I believe in nursing on demand. After baby is done I plan to pump as I had difficulty with my son; I didn't lactate nearly enough to sustain even an ant. I plan to pump to (hopefully) get my body to do its job properly.

ilovemykids732
by on Aug. 3, 2013 at 6:59 AM
1 mom liked this

It made me SUPER hungry and about the same tiredness I had been since I got pregnant...

I used to nurse the kids [had 2 sons, seperate times] when they were hungry... and pump whenever I could... :)

I rested while pumping... I didnt have to SLEEP... just sitting up with my feet up was enough most of the time!! :)

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