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Group b strep

Posted by on Dec. 17, 2008 at 1:08 PM
  • 12 Replies
I had group b strep with my ds. I went to my OB appt yesterday and he told me that if I was positive with it the first pregnancy then I will always test positive. Is this true? What treatment will they give me? I had an IV when I was in labor with my son.
by on Dec. 17, 2008 at 1:08 PM
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Replies (1-10):
funmomof2
by on Dec. 17, 2008 at 1:09 PM

Good question...IDK the answer,but I have tested neg with both of my pregnancies so will I always be neg??

              Kelley




          busy momexpecting girl

Pauline3283
by on Dec. 17, 2008 at 1:14 PM

No, but most doctors will tell you that.  You could test positive today and be negative next week. I refused testing last pregnancy and just did a rinse during labor just in case.

Pauline, homeschooling, non-vaxing, homebirthing, no spanking, anti-CIO, anti-circ, extended breastfeeding, cloth diapering, extended rear facing, co-sleeping, baby wearing mom to Christopher, Amanda, Francesca, Zachary, Nicholas and Aaron due in February.







doulala
by on Dec. 17, 2008 at 1:24 PM

I have some info collected about this:



Group B Streptococcus - What Does the Research Really Say?

In the US, most pregnant women have heard of Group B Streptococcus, but unfortunately know little true information about the condition and the real risks involved.  The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommend that all pregnant women be screened between weeks 35 and 37 of their pregnancies to determine if they are carriers of GBS by taking a swab of the vaginal and rectal areas. About 30% of pregnant women are found to be colonized with GBS in one of both areas.


The recommended treatment by the CDC and ACOG is intravenous antibiotics during birthing because GBS can be passed from you to the baby during delivery and cause sepsis (a blood infection), pneumonia, and/or meningitis (an infection of the fluid and lining of the brain).

       

           Why wouldn't a mother choose antibiotics?


To answer this question, we need to look at what GBS truly is and why it might not be such a good idea to recommend that a third of all pregnant women expose themselves and their babies to antibiotics from birth.  



GBS is a bacterium that normally lives in the intestinal tracts of many healthy people.  In truth, you should never be termed “GBS infected” but rather “GBS colonized”.  Remember that the intestinal tract is composed of normal healthy bacteria, including GBS.  It is usually a transient condition that will come and go through your pregnancy.  You may swab positive at 36 weeks, only to be negative again at 38 weeks. 


GBS can cause problems only when it is present in the genital area during birthing and delivery. When this happens, there is a very small risk that the bacteria will be passed on to the baby and become sick. Approximately 0.0225% of women found to be GBS+ at 35 to 37 weeks who aren’t treated with antibiotics will have a baby who becomes ill.  That's 1 in 4444 babies who will become ill.


But here’s the most important point: in women who do receive antibiotics, 0.0225% of babies will go on to become ill from GBS.   That's also 1 in 4444 babies who will become ill.

                              

 

Antibiotics make absolutely no difference in the number of babies who will die from GBS.


In truth, there are many reasons you don’t want antibiotics for Group B Streptococcus, besides the fact that they don’t improve outcomes at all.  These include:


•    Increasing occurrence of antibiotic-resistant infections (“superbugs” - think MRSA)

•    Use of antibiotics has increased risk of developing other infections (sepsis & E. Coli included)

•    Colonization of GBS is a poor indicator of which babies will become ill

•    Antibiotics fail to prevent infection in 30% of cases


The most-commonly used antibiotic for treating Group B Streptococcus during birthing is penicillin. Fewer bacteria currently show a resistance to penicillin than to other antibiotics used to treat GBS.  Ampicillin and amoxicillin are virtually worthless for treating GBS due to overuse that has now made Group B Streptococcus resistant to them.  It’s only a matter of time until penicillin is also ineffective against GBS.  The superbug is on its way. 

 

If you are allergic to penicillin, your options decrease.  29% of Group B Streptococcus strains are resistant to non-penicillin antibiotics.  If you don’t know if you’re allergic or even if you’ve had it in the past, there’s a 1/10 chance of a mild reaction such as a rash, and a 1/10,000 chance of anaphylaxis, a life-threatening allergic reaction. 

 

Two in 10,000 babies may be saved by antibiotics during birth, but this comes at the cost of giving 1/3 of all pregnant women antibiotics.  The risks of developing a superbug are greater than the chances of saving your baby with antibiotics.  This also doesn’t take into account how many other infections babies given antibiotics may develop other than Group B Streptococcus.


       

        What are the risk factors for mothers with GBS?

 

 

There are three significant factors that place your baby at increased risk of infection: fever during birthing, water breaking 18 hours or more before birthing (prolonged rupture of membranes, or PROM), and/or birthing or broken water before 37 weeks.  Other factors that can contribute to a newborn's risk of contracting Group B Streptococcus infection include age, ethnicity, and medical criteria, such as the following: being born to a mother who is less than 20 years old, being African American, large amounts of GBS bacteria in the vaginal tract, and having a previous baby with GBS disease.


       

        What are the symptoms of GBS infection in a baby?

 

There are two forms of Group B Streptococcus infection: early and late onset. In early-onset GBS disease, your baby will become ill within seven days of birth.  In severe early-onset GBS infection, about 6 percent of babies will die from complications of the infection. Full-term babies are less likely to die; 2-8% suffer fatal complications. Premature babies have mortality rates of 25-30%.  Late-onset GBS infection is more complicated and may not have anything to do with whether you had GBS during birthing.  It occurs between seven days and three months of age.


Symptoms of early-onset Group B Streptococcus infection include any of the following: fever or abnormally low body temperature, jaundice (yellowing of the skin and whites of the eyes), poor feeding, vomiting, seizures, difficulty in breathing, swelling of the abdomen, and bloody stools. The most common symptom is difficulty breathing, which is also the most common complication in babies whose mothers choose drugs during birthing.  Since these symptoms can occur in so many circumstances not related to GBS, a C-Reactive protein test can be given to a symptomatic baby to reveal the presence of an active infection.

 

 

        Are there alternatives to antibiotics?

 

 

Even though Group B Streptococcus is a transient infection, without an active effort to eradicate the GBS colonization, it is likely that you will still be colonized after 37 weeks.  We will see better outcomes by simply focusing on reducing colonization rather than treating it after the fact.


There are many probiotic, natural remedies that focus on restoring a healthy vaginal flora balance, reducing bacterial overgrowth, and directly reducing the bacterial concentration.   These treatments can begin at 32 weeks rather than waiting for a positive culture.  Another option is to NOT screen for beta strep during pregnancy, but to follow a strict protocol during birthing if you have the following risk factors: 1) fever over 38 degrees Celsius, 2) pre-term birthing < 37 weeks, 3) prolonged rupture of membranes > 18 hours, 4) multiple births, and 5) previously-infected baby.  In these cases antibiotics may be indicated.  Those infants who are symptomatic (fever, fast breathing, poor feeding, high pitched cry) can be evaluated for sepsis and given antibiotics for 48-72 hours.  Alternately, you can request a C-reactive protein test to determine the presence of an active infection before giving antibiotics to the baby.

Return to Top of Group B Streptococcus

Treatment Options

Below are a series of treatment options for you to consider: 


TREATMENT OPTION #1:
If you have a heavy colonization, use EHB capsules by NF Formulas given over a 10-day period (6 caps per day), and Tea tree oil vaginal suppositories 3-4 times daily for that time.  This can be done on a small size tampon or a cotton ball, whichever is more comfortable.  Colonization is measured on a range from 1-4 with 1 being minimal and 4 being heavy colonization.



TREATMENT OPTION #2:
Take 500mg of Vitamin C every 4 waking hours, 1 EHB (NF Formulas) capsule every 4 waking hours, Propolis 4x daily, and insert a tampon soaked in 2% Tea Tree oil solution (2%Tea Tree essential oil, 98% Olive oil).  Leave the tampon in for 4 hours each day for 6 days. 


TREATMENT OPTION #3:
Take 3 caps of Congaplex by Standard Brands 3 times a day for a week, then re-culture. If still positive, take 1 cap per day until the end of pregnancy.


TREATMENT OPTION #4:
At 32 weeks, begin to take a supplement of 500 mg of Vitamin C and one cup of burdock root and Echinacea root infusion. To prepare the infusion, steep one-half ounce of each of the herbs in four cups of boiling water for two hours.  Strain and take the above dose, storing the rest in the refrigerator for the next day.


TREATMENT OPTION #5
Drink 3 teaspoons of Colloidal Silver, which is silver suspended in water, per day between meals.  Hold the liquid in your mouth a few minutes before swallowing.  Colloidal Silver can be purchased in most health food stores. It is antibiotic in nature and safe in pregnancy.


TREATMENT OPTION #6:
Use of oral antibiotics: 3 a day starting at week 37 and then one a day until birthing begins. When birthing begins, take one every 4-6 hours until the baby is born. (It seems like a lot, but it lets you avoid the cascade of interventions that IV antibiotics brings at the hospital).

 

TREATMENT OPTION #7:
Treat with antibiotics by intramuscular injection (IM) before the birth. This method will cover you for 30 days after the injections (4 injections total to give the full dose).


TREATMENT OPTION #8:
Take 1/3 teaspoon of echinacea and astragalus tinctures twice daily. You can get dried astragalus in the herb department of health food stores.  Cook two strips into a pot of rice or soup 2-3 times per week Remove the strips when done cooking and eat the rice or soup.  Astragalus is an immune system tonic used in Chinese medicine.


TREATMENT OPTION #9:
Make a garlic elixir by blending 1/2 cup of honey, 1/4 cup of apple cider vinegar, and half a bulb of fresh garlic until liquified. Take 1/2 teaspoon up to twice daily.  Season to taste with honey or vinegar.

Return to Top of Group B Streptococcus


PREVENTION TIPS

•    Breastfeed immediately and frequently.  The colostrum is the best antibiotic treatment your baby could ever get.

•    Refuse vaginal exams

•    DO NOT permit artificial rupture of membranes.

 

 

For the references:   


http://www.givingbirthnaturally.com/group-b-streptococcus.html




If you don't know your options, you don't have any.           ~Korte & Scaer

Mothers need to know that their care and their choices won't be compromised by birth politics.                                                                                            ~Jennifer Rosenberg

ElizabethBailey
by on Dec. 17, 2008 at 1:26 PM

I wouldn't suggest refusing testing...Group B can cause some VERY serious complications for your baby...and Im sure you dont want to be the cause of that.

For this baby they will just give you some antibiotic through your iv before you deliver...I believe the protcal for it...is atleast one bag in before you deliver the baby. But they try to get two in. They will also give the baby some antibiotics when born which Im sure they did with your previous baby.

It's not a big deal if you use the precautions...and they know ahead of time. It is rare that the Group B will cause defects or serious medical issues when you use the precautions of meds before the baby comes...

Quoting Pauline3283:

No, but most doctors will tell you that.  You could test positive today and be negative next week. I refused testing last pregnancy and just did a rinse during labor just in case.


Mommy2BeFeb2009
by on Dec. 17, 2008 at 1:28 PM

Once positive always positive.... they will give you an IV antibiotic during labor to help prevent passing it along.  However if you are negative you can become a host and be positive at some point.

Proud Mommy to Samantha 4 years old
Eagerly Awaiting AUSTIN JOSEPH!
pregnancy calendar
ElizabethBailey
by on Dec. 17, 2008 at 1:33 PM

Here's the bottom line....Group B can kill a newborn child. As a mother...a good mother...who would want to take that chance.

If you look the subject up you will find 100's of different oponions of how to treat it or weither it's harmful or not...and blah blah blah blah.

Trust your doctor to take care of you and your baby...if you dont trust them...then change doctors. But dont make the mistake of believe some of the junk you will find online and making a decision that you may regret later in life!!!!

For example...there are other antibiotics that they can give you besides penicillian....they gave me Gen....and it doesn't matter which area you are infected...for anyone who has had a vaginal birth...knows that both those areas...touch at some point and time during delivery...duh huh

jenjobrien
by on Dec. 17, 2008 at 2:03 PM

Shes not saying shes refusing testing or treatment.  Shes asking if her doctor is right about always being positive and what kind of treatments there are for it. 

hooraywesay
by on Dec. 17, 2008 at 3:19 PM

I am a postpartum nurse. Our protocol is that any mom that is positive for GBS get at LEAST one dose of penicillin IV (unless you're allergic, then there are other meds) and it has to be at least 4 hours before you have the baby. Our policy is one dose every 4 hours until baby is born. If you miss this window, we draw a complete blood count and blood culture on the baby when he/she is 4 hours old to test for infection. 99% of the time the baby is fine, but it's the 1% that is so scary!!

Lilypie Expecting a baby PicLilypie Expecting a baby Ticker

Pauline3283
by on Dec. 17, 2008 at 3:24 PM

I have always understood that and I will continue to refuse testing.  I am well aware of exactly what GBS is.  Either way I will not be getting any antibiotics and I will not be in a hospital with an IV.  If you read more into it you will find there is alternative treatment which is what I will be doing so if the test is positive or not, it really doesn't matter.

Quoting ElizabethBailey:

I wouldn't suggest refusing testing...Group B can cause some VERY serious complications for your baby...and Im sure you dont want to be the cause of that.

For this baby they will just give you some antibiotic through your iv before you deliver...I believe the protcal for it...is atleast one bag in before you deliver the baby. But they try to get two in. They will also give the baby some antibiotics when born which Im sure they did with your previous baby.

It's not a big deal if you use the precautions...and they know ahead of time. It is rare that the Group B will cause defects or serious medical issues when you use the precautions of meds before the baby comes...

Quoting Pauline3283:

No, but most doctors will tell you that.  You could test positive today and be negative next week. I refused testing last pregnancy and just did a rinse during labor just in case.

 


Pauline, homeschooling, non-vaxing, homebirthing, no spanking, anti-CIO, anti-circ, extended breastfeeding, cloth diapering, extended rear facing, co-sleeping, baby wearing mom to Christopher, Amanda, Francesca, Zachary, Nicholas and Aaron due in February.







Pauline3283
by on Dec. 17, 2008 at 3:30 PM

I've read this a few times after you posted.  It's really good info!  I was wondering if you've ever seen the studies on chlorhexidine?  There was a study not too long ago that showed it to be just as effective as antibiotics.  I have always tested positive so at my last birth I used a hibiclense rinse every 3 hours and opted not to bother testing.  I had a really good article on it but I'm not sure what I did with it.  I may go looking for it today.

Quoting doulala:

I have some info collected about this:

 


Group B Streptococcus - What Does the Research Really Say?

 

Pauline, homeschooling, non-vaxing, homebirthing, no spanking, anti-CIO, anti-circ, extended breastfeeding, cloth diapering, extended rear facing, co-sleeping, baby wearing mom to Christopher, Amanda, Francesca, Zachary, Nicholas and Aaron due in February.







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