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Hoffman's Technique *piog*

Posted by on Dec. 17, 2008 at 9:22 PM
  • 5 Replies

My midwife wants me to start doing the Hoffman Technique exercises -

She already has me wearing nipple shells pretty much 24/7 (the only time I don't wear them is when I'm away from home - mostly because they're bulky and really obvious under my shirt) -

Just FYI, I'm doing all this because I have flat nipples.

Anyways, my question is, how long should I spend doing these exercises every day? She didn't tell me anything specifically, so I wasn't really sure.

Also, is there anything else I can do to help my milk supply come in? I stumbled across a web-site, motherlove.com, where they sell all organic products and they have one called 'More Milk Plus.' Has anyone ever used this? Did you use it before you were BFing or do you only start those types of supplements after? Or is there something else you can use prior to?

Thanks for all your help in advance!

Holly

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by on Dec. 17, 2008 at 9:22 PM
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Replies (1-5):
1stTimeMomHolly
by on Dec. 17, 2008 at 9:43 PM

BUMP

WifeoftheWizard
by on Dec. 17, 2008 at 9:45 PM

bump

jonezy
by on Dec. 17, 2008 at 10:34 PM

bump

WifeoftheWizard
by on Dec. 17, 2008 at 11:52 PM

Here is a post that I found on another site.  It helps a little.  I have an inverted nipple and was wondering the same thing.

I am pregnant with my third child and I had a lot of problems nursing my first two children, due to flat and very sensitive nipples. I wore nipple shells in my bra during my last pregnancy and this helped a little but not nearly enough. I have heard about a prenatal exercise called the Hoffman Technique and was wondering if you could either describe this.


Breast shells and nipple preparation (the Hoffman Technique) are often recommended to help evert flat or inverted nipples. There are no studies to conclusively prove the effectiveness of using either of these prenatally, to help break the adhesions and draw out the nipples.

The Hoffman Technique (Hoffman, 1953) is intended to loosen adhesions. Place your two thumbs opposite each other at the base of your nipple. Press firmly and at the same time, pull the thumbs away from each other. Rotate the thumbs around the base of your nipple. This should be done five times each day. Discuss use of this technique with your Health Care Provider if you have a history of premature birth, or factors currently predisposing you to premature labor. I would not recommend starting this technique until the last trimester of pregnancy. The hormones of pregnancy often help to loosen adhesions without any interventions.

With flat or inverted nipples, it is particularly important to put your baby to your breast as soon after the birth as possible. Allowing your newborn access to your breast in the first hour or two has an imprinting effect.

Avoid bottles and pacifiers in the hospital and at home during the first six weeks. It seems to be particularly difficult for babies to go back and forth between artificial nipples and the breast when their mom has flat or inverted nipples.

Many mothers have success in drawing out their nipples for a feed by using a breastpump for a couple of minutes before nursing. This is usually only necessary during the first week or two. Work with a Lactation Consultant to help assure good positioning and attachment. Proper positioning is very important for all moms, but especially for those with flat or inverted nipples. Best wishes!

 

staciep2
by on Dec. 18, 2008 at 1:59 PM

I have inverted nipples and my Dr had told me to use a breast pump every day for like 10min each side to help them come out and also after my son was born they gave me this like rubber nipple that I put over mine and then the baby latched on to it and it pulled the nipple out. It worked well. They also gave me the dome things after he was born but I never used those. I still have them so I may try them this time before the baby is born. As for ur milk , mine came in about 2days after Jay was born. I dont think u would use that stuff till after the baby is born.  Yeah alittle will come out now but ur body will tell its self when it needs to let down ur milk. So I wouldnt worry about that now.

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