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Question about induction....

Posted by on Feb. 13, 2009 at 7:31 PM
  • 6 Replies

I found out today that my wonderful doctor is going to induce me on Monday!!! I am 4 cm dilated and 60% effaced. She also said that the baby is @ -1 station and head down!! She swept my membranes to see if this would lead to me progressing more on my own before Monday.


I am wodering though if any of you have went in for an induction and started off no pitocin just having the doc break your water. This is what she is going to do to me as I really want to do this without pain meds even if I do need pitocin. She said since I was so "favorable" dilated and effaced with inconsistent contractions she thinks this will do the trick and I won't need pitocin. What do you ladies think?? Any personal experiences that are similar???

by on Feb. 13, 2009 at 7:31 PM
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Replies (1-6):
cadlecr4
by on Feb. 13, 2009 at 7:34 PM

I was 3cm and the dr broke my water. Thats all I needed. 7 hours later Katilyn was here!

hotmoma2006
by on Feb. 13, 2009 at 7:40 PM

I went to the dr. with mild contractions but consistant with time and they checked me i was not in active labor and was 4 cm dilated. The baby's heart droped so they sent me to room to induce. They broke my water and didnt need any other help. He came 4 hours later

doulala
by on Feb. 13, 2009 at 7:41 PM

If you can really take it easy, relax, focus inward, talking to your baby, maybe some sex, walking...   it might help.

(AROM) Breaking the water is not a good idea, imo.  It can force the baby into a less-favorable position, making labor longer, less productive, increases the risk for infection, for non-engaged babies, it increases the cord prolapse risk, and mom is also sentenced to deliver by a certain time or she'll have a cesarean.   So I think it's not fair to the baby.

For most moms, having contractions after a rupture can feel more painful, so more likely to increase risks if mom chooses an epidural.    This is a highly "managed" scenario!  








Excerpted from Birth as an American Rite of Passage


Artificial Rupture of the Membranes (Amniotomy)


Description and Official Rationale


Amniotomy is frequently performed on women who labor in hospitals for the purpose of speeding up their labors, or for insertion of the internal electronic fetal monitor; occasionally it is performed so that the physician can take fetal blood samples, and/or ascertain whether or not there is evidence of meconium staining (fetal bowel movement), which under the technocratic model is considered to be indicative of fetal distress. The procedure is simple: a hospital attendant inserts an instrument like a crochet hook through the cervix, and snags and breaks the amniotic sac.


Physiological Effects


In a review of the literature, McKay and Mahan find that, if amniotomy is not performed and membranes are allowed to rupture spontaneously, most women will have intact membranes until they are either in very active labor or reach complete cervical dilation (1983:173). Although amniotomy does indeed often result in speedier labors (if performed once active labor is well-established), it also increases the danger of fetal infection from vaginal exams and/or inserted instruments. (Such infections can of course be cured with antibiotics, but that process can mean considerable discomfort and many extra days in the hospital, as several of the women in my study discovered.) Should false labor be mistaken for real labor, and amniotomy be performed too early, the 24-hour rule will be invoked, and pitocin induction with all its attendant hazards will be required (this particular complication can be avoided if amniotomy is performed only after 5-6 centimeters dilation is reached).


A further hazard of amniotomy is that without the protective cushion of the amniotic fluid the baby's head is subject to greater pressure during contractions, and the umbilical cord is more likely to become compressed, resulting in oxygen deprivation and consequent respiratory distress. Cord prolapse is also more common after amniotomy (Pritchard and MacDonald 1985:289). Moreover, unruptured membranes often cushion not only the fetal head but also the mother's perineum, allowing for more gentle stretching and reducing the likelihood of tears. The combination of rupture of the cushioning bag with pitocin-augmented contractions often leads to more rapid and forced stretching of the perineum and so to more tears (Brigitte Jordan, personal communication).


(ACOG)....Complications associated with artificial rupture of membranes include an increased risk of prolapsed cord and/or cord compression; a commitment to delivery within a narrow window of time; rupture of vasa previa; and increased risk of intrauterine infection (American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, 1999).

Obstetrical interventions — Obstetrical intervention may result in iatrogenic UCP(Umbilical Cord Prolapse). The evidence for causation of cord prolapse with obstetrical interventions is conflicting and it is often difficult to determine whether UCP would have occurred spontaneously if the intervention had not been performed [11] . The purported mechanism for UCP in this setting involves disengagement of the fetal head during the intervention with a high outward flow of amniotic fluid, which carries the umbilical cord with it. Author
Victoria Belogolovkin, MD
Melissa Bush, MD
Keith Eddleman, MD
(January 4, 2008)  

http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0301211599000585
this one is from ACOG:
http://pt.wkhealth.com/pt/re/ajog/userLogin.htm;jsessionid=LG0pSnmKLYKGyVTpzFm3sb3JPKngV006hys5d9SQ5XwBW9nJyLJK!446770951!181195629!8091!-1

http://www.mihsr.monash.org/cce/res/pdf/c/115.pdf

The knowledge of how to give birth without outside intervention lies deep within each woman. Successful childbirth depends on an acceptance of the process. ~Suzanne Arms


Birth is not an emergency. It is simply an emergence.” - Jeannine Parvati Baker

giffer
by on Feb. 13, 2009 at 7:44 PM

my water broke naturally but after 24 hrs still no baby so they had to give me pitocin. i don't know if that's considered induction or not, but after i got the pitocin she was born within 4 hrs. i wish i had it sooner but i really wanted to go natural.

my son was the opposite. i had contractions for about 12 hrs but my water never broke so they broke it & about 2 hrs later he was born, no pitocin.

i hate mondays

doulala
by on Feb. 13, 2009 at 7:45 PM

I had opposite water-breaking experiences, too:    (no Pitocin)

My first~ water broke, no contractions for over a week.
My second~   water broke when baby's head was coming out.

Quoting giffer:

my water broke naturally but after 24 hrs still no baby so they had to give me pitocin. i don't know if that's considered induction or not, but after i got the pitocin she was born within 4 hrs. i wish i had it sooner but i really wanted to go natural.

my son was the opposite. i had contractions for about 12 hrs but my water never broke so they broke it & about 2 hrs later he was born, no pitocin.


The knowledge of how to give birth without outside intervention lies deep within each woman. Successful childbirth depends on an acceptance of the process. ~Suzanne Arms


Birth is not an emergency. It is simply an emergence.” - Jeannine Parvati Baker

SaturnsMom
by on Feb. 13, 2009 at 7:48 PM

I feel inclined to tell you that once your water is broken they out you on a 24 hour timeline to get the baby out.  Now if you really think that you will go into labor on your own then go for it but I wouldnt do that just for the simple reason that if you end up with a particualrly long labor then your increasing your odds of ending up with a c-section.

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