Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)

Toddlers & Preschoolers Toddlers & Preschoolers
My daughter is 3 and the school district here offers a blended preschool for kids with disabilities as well as so-called "normal" kids. My daughter belongs to the latter group. Does anyone have experience with these blended classrooms and if they are beneficial for kids without special needs? What do you think?

Update--
Thanks for all of the replies! I just wanted to clarify a couple things for those who might have mis-understood my original post...
--My daughter is not a SN child. She's considered "typical."
--The classroom has one teacher and two additional staff. The students will consist of 5 SN kids and 12-15 typically developing peers.
--I LOVE the idea of teaching my daughter tolerance of ALL other kids, and I can't find any reason why it wouldn't be an awesome class. I was just curious if anyone had anything to add-good or bad-- that I might have overlooked.

Thanks for all the replies, and we registered her to begin classes in the fall this year!! (Now all I have to worry about is getting her completely potty-trained by then! Haha)
by on May. 18, 2012 at 12:52 PM
Replies (11-20):
3gr8tKids
by Member on May. 19, 2012 at 1:39 PM

THIS:

Quoting mypbandj:

That's how all the special Ed preschools are run - by law those kids have to be with typically developing peers (unless there is a danger of course). It's good for all the kids. My son was in one of those classrooms and unless a child had a obvious disability, like down syndrome or spina bifida, nobody knew which kids were role models and which kids weren't! Besides, kids with disabilities are going to be in regular classrooms throughout your child's school career anyway (if you do the pubic school route).


momamanda
by on May. 20, 2012 at 7:39 AM
1 mom liked this

I think that is awesome! It helps them understand at a young age not to judge a book by it's cover! When my oldest dd was in pre-k. She made friends with a little girl who was in a wheel chair. Everyday after school in the car line she would play with this girl and draw her pictures. I had no idea until we got a birthday invitaion for this girl. When we went to the party is when I realized she was in a wheel chair. Her mom told me that the little girl just loved my daughter and talked about her all the time and hangs all of the pictures she drew her up on the fridge! I was impressed with my daughter she saw it as no big deal it was just another friend!

Kris_PBG
by on May. 20, 2012 at 8:28 AM
2 moms liked this
Yes - in college I worked in a program you are describing.

It was definitely beneficial for both the "typical" and "non-typical" children.

There were lower numbers of children in the class as well as increased numbers of staff, so all kids benefitted from great teacher :child ratios.

Children also were very compassionate and accepting due to being to exposed to children with a range of abilities and disabilities.

The teachers of the program were more highly qualified than in a "typical" pre-k setting and the assistants also had a much more training than you typically find in daycare settings.

Hope this helps!
Kris_PBG
by on May. 20, 2012 at 8:30 AM
Quoting mypbandj:That's how all the special Ed preschools are run - by law those kids have to be with typically developing peers (unless there is a danger of course). It's good for all the kids. My son was in one of those classrooms and unless a child had a obvious disability, like down syndrome or spina bifida, nobody knew which kids were role models and which kids weren't! Besides, kids with disabilities are going to be in regular classrooms throughout your child's school career anyway (if you do the pubic school route).


Actually, that is not true. Our school district's special education pre-K classes are not run in this way.
.Angelica.
by Angie on May. 20, 2012 at 9:24 AM

no experience.

5BMom
by on May. 20, 2012 at 6:03 PM
1 mom liked this
I think it is beneficial at this age, no doubt. I don't send my kids to school, but if I did I would LOVE to get them in a program like that:-)
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
SarahSuzyQ
by on May. 20, 2012 at 7:46 PM
I attended a preschool like this as a child, along with many of my peers. The education was comparable to other "normal" preschools, but the socialization was really significant. Being exposed at a young age to kids with all different ability levels really set us up to have strong values around respecting individuals and treating people with dignity. It was a marked difference in the teen years, you could tell kids who had that kind of exposure.

As PPs have said, the teacher ratios were low and the staff more qualified as well... Just sharing from the "kid" perspective since that's what I had! :-)

It was invaluable for me and my brother. If the curriculum for the typically functioning children is as that of a regular private preschool, I would jump at the opportunity to share this experience with my own kids. We don't have anything like that here.
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
zolanmel
by on May. 20, 2012 at 7:55 PM
I gave no experience.i mainstreamed my autistic daughter and it turned out great
Posted on CafeMom Mobile
ZsMommy
by on May. 21, 2012 at 12:15 AM
1 mom liked this

From the opposite side of the fence (special needs child)-her integrated classrooms have been a blessing for both she and her classmates,they (normal kids) learn tolerance and see she may have delays but she's still a kid like them,and our daughter has made friends,improved her speech and social skils and is better off al around not being in an isolated classroom. Life isn't isolated,learning tolerance,compassion,and understanding differences at an early education level to me is beneficial all around and makes for better adults ater in life.

Bubbles318
by on May. 21, 2012 at 12:30 AM

I know that growing up, we had a few special needs kids in our class. And I think it not only makes you appreciate what you have but it also makes you more accepting of other people who may need that little bit of extra help. There was a girl I grew up with who was very much special needs, she had a form of mental retardation, although I never knew exactly what. She used to tell me I was her best friend because I was so nice to her. I first met her when I was six. 

Add your quick reply below:
You must be a member to reply to this post.
Join the Meeting Place for Moms!
Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun!

(minimum 6 characters)