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Epi-pen in school?

Posted by on Aug. 2, 2013 at 9:24 AM
  • 10 Replies

A little background... I am deathly allergic to bee stings, I carry an Epi-pen. When I was in school my mom made it clear (with dr's note and phone call)that I was to carry it with me at all times. I was old enough to know how to use it, and my teachers knew how to as well. It is a possibility that my boys could be allergic too. I explained to their Dr. and she thought that they were too young to get tested and she prescribed epi-pens for them (just in case). She understood that I know what to watch for and how to use the epi-pen if needed.

Well my oldest starts pre-k next month and when I was filling out his paperwork I noticed it said that ALL medications must be kept in the nurses office. My worry is what if a bee comes into the classroom and he gets stung and has a anaphalactic reaction? Is the nurse going to be able to get to his classroom in time? Or do I see if his teacher can keep it with her? I don't know if they will make an exception and I don't want to cause problems. We don't definitely know if he is allergic but when he gets bug bites the bite swells pretty bad (I swell up bad too).

I do not think I am over protective. This is the only thing that has me worried about him starting school. Any suggestions/ideas would be greatly appreciated. Thank you in advance.

by on Aug. 2, 2013 at 9:24 AM
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Replies (1-10):
CometGirl
by New Member on Aug. 2, 2013 at 9:27 AM
1 mom liked this

 I work in a PK classroom and we kept an epi-pen in our classroom last year for one student.  He was too young to keep it with him all the time and we do not have a nurse at our school every day.

1st_time_mom789
by on Aug. 2, 2013 at 9:27 AM

Honestly, I'd talk to the teacher and see if she can keep it on her. What happens if your son gets stung while on the playground? I've never kept any of my meds in the nurse's office. I always kept mine with me in case anything happened. I grew up with asthma and am also allergic to bee stings so I know your concern with your son and him not being able to get his epi pen on time. GL! I hope the school doesn't give you a hard time.

corrinacs
by Platinum Member on Aug. 2, 2013 at 10:06 AM

Unfortuantely, this is the way its always been :/.  I did somehow convince Caden's kindergarten teacher to keep the epipens with her during the school year.  But, they aren't really allowed to do that for some odd reason :/.

So far, we've been good :).  They know about his food allergies and we've come up with plans to prevent exposure....that alone seems to be good enough!

I'd talk to htem more about prevention strategies, like.....ensuring that the kids understand bees don't sting unless provoked.  If there's a lot of bees in the courtyard, then the children should be inside until pest control can take care of it.

Hope this helps :)

DanNStevesmom
by Member on Aug. 2, 2013 at 11:00 AM

Thank you. I am just hoping that the school will understand and let his teacher keep it with her. My mom had to argue with the school about letting me carry mine. My son does know not to swat at them and to try to stay away.

Molimomma
by Member on Aug. 2, 2013 at 1:14 PM
If there is a school nurse then they will probably make you keep it with her because she is the one responsible for all meds and legally the teacher should not have the responsibility of administering it or keeping track of it when it expires. Plus she would probably have to keep it locked up in a drawer anyway for safety so it wouldnt be that much faster.My niece is allergic to peanuts and her school always kept her epi pen in the nurses office. There's just too many ways another child can get ahold of it, or it can get lost or damaged and then it is useless anyway. In the nurses' office it is safe and available no matter what in a known spot(also better when there is a substitute or your child is not in the classroom like during lunch, specials like art or P.E, etc. I've had children with severe asthma before and even their inhalers are kept in the nurses office.
JATaft828
by Member on Aug. 2, 2013 at 1:21 PM

 All schools are different, maybe ask the school what there plan of action is if something was to come up and the nurse had it, and see if they have conducted a mock drill sorta thing and see how long it took to get the meds to the room etc, or ask for one to be done to ease your mind in case they say there is no way the teacher can have it with them. When I worked in childcare all of our meds were kept in the front office with a lead and then we had a plan of action if something were to happen and we needed to get to them asap.

DanNStevesmom
by Member on Aug. 2, 2013 at 2:35 PM

 This is my concern. If he is on the playground and gets stung, if he has a serious allergic reaction like I did, there won't be time to get to the nurses office.

When I found out I was allergic I was nine. My mom knew that bee sting allergies ran in her family and had an Epi-pen Jr. just in case. I had gotten stung and she ran to get it (maybe one minute went by), my throat was already closed up and I couldn't breathe. She stabbed me with it while she told my sister to get the phone and call 911. I don't remember anything between that and the emt's putting me in the ambulance. My whole body swelled up, they had to cut my sneakers off.

I can understand that the pen being in the classroom, there is a risk that the other kids might get into it. I am hoping the school will be understanding.


Quoting 1st_time_mom789:

Honestly, I'd talk to the teacher and see if she can keep it on her. What happens if your son gets stung while on the playground? I've never kept any of my meds in the nurse's office. I always kept mine with me in case anything happened. I grew up with asthma and am also allergic to bee stings so I know your concern with your son and him not being able to get his epi pen on time. GL! I hope the school doesn't give you a hard time.


 

PEEK05
by on Aug. 2, 2013 at 5:46 PM

While that would be nice, we weren't allowed to keep things like that on us when I worked in child care.  Maybe other places are different though.

Quoting 1st_time_mom789:

Honestly, I'd talk to the teacher and see if she can keep it on her. What happens if your son gets stung while on the playground? I've never kept any of my meds in the nurse's office. I always kept mine with me in case anything happened. I grew up with asthma and am also allergic to bee stings so I know your concern with your son and him not being able to get his epi pen on time. GL! I hope the school doesn't give you a hard time.





CJsMommy622
by Member on Aug. 2, 2013 at 5:51 PM
Definitely not too young to be tested! My DD is 4 and that epi pen is with her teachers at all times. She knows how to use it, as does my son (I taught them with the practice one and we practice every so often), but I know its not safe for her to carry around at school by herself. She is also allergic to bees, and the pen goes outside as well. Her old teacher had one for herself and pushed to get it in my DD's IEP :) She has a medical section for other stuff, so I they just added it in.
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collinsmommy0
by Silver Member on Aug. 2, 2013 at 7:20 PM
I would talk with the nurse, principal, or teacher about keeping it in the classroom.

There's no reason why they can't be tested for it.....DS is 2 & has had allergy testing. It's also unlikely to have a bad reaction the first time (more likely the second time)

Also, look up the new epipen - it's aviQ I think. It gives verbal directions to whoever is giving it & makes it really dumb-proof.
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