Poll

Question: Should schools ban peanuts if a student is deathly allergic?

Options:

Yes, it's a matter of life and death!

Yes, the school could be sued otherwise.

Yes, but only in the affected child's class or lunchroom group.

Yes, and could they ban junk food, too?

Yes, everyone has a right to be safe and healthy.

No, all kids have a right to eat what they want to.

No, my child will only eat peanut-butter sandwiches.

No, just segregate the child with the allergy.

No, just segregate the child who wants to eat peanuts.

No, it's an overreaction caused by pushy parents and weak school administrators.


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Total Votes: 20

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What is your reasoning? On a scale of 1 to 10, with 1 being the lowest, what would you consider your level of education on the matter?

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Comments:

joani...
Jun. 3, 2008 at 9:10 PM

2 maybe.  I have issues with a lot of things that schools allow/don't allow.  The thing is, where do you draw the line.  There is definitely a need to have an area where students with allergies can be safe, but at the same time not making them feel as though there is something "wrong" with them.  You can't take a kid and say "ok, you have allergies so you have to sit over here in a corner away from everyone else"  at the same time you can't tell a student they can't have peanuts or peanut butter at school.  Thats a really hard question.

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Krist...
Jun. 3, 2008 at 9:15 PM  Schools should provide alternative nutritional foods for those with specific allergies AND the child should be aware of their allergies in order to avoid foods which could be deadly.

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arbro...
Jun. 3, 2008 at 9:20 PM

http://www.cafemom.com/journals/read/1026826/Are_you_ready_to_hear_this_Momma_Bear_ROAR

Check out my other Journal for a little more information on  peanut bans.

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arbro...
Jun. 3, 2008 at 9:25 PM

joaniedanger Jun. 3, 2008 at 6:10 PM (Delete)

2 maybe.  I have issues with a lot of things that schools allow/don't allow.  The thing is, where do you draw the line.  There is definitely a need to have an area where students with allergies can be safe, but at the same time not making them feel as though there is something "wrong" with them.  You can't take a kid and say "ok, you have allergies so you have to sit over here in a corner away from everyone else"  at the same time you can't tell a student they can't have peanuts or peanut butter at school.  Thats a really hard question.

 Shouldn't the line be drawn at whether a life is at stake or not?

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arbro...
Jun. 3, 2008 at 9:26 PM

KristiS11384 Jun. 3, 2008 at 6:15 PM (Delete)

 Schools should provide alternative nutritional foods for those with specific allergies AND the child should be aware of their allergies in order to avoid foods which could be deadly.

 How do you address the cross contamination issue?

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Krist...
Jun. 3, 2008 at 9:30 PM If parent's taught their kids proper hygiene It wouldn't be an issue.  I would suggest if your child is old enough to no better not to eat it, send them with a travel size anti-bacterial gel/wipes.  Most teachers have some in their desks as well

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arbro...
Jun. 3, 2008 at 9:39 PM

KristiS11384 Jun. 3, 2008 at 6:30 PM (Delete)

If parent's taught their kids proper hygiene It wouldn't be an issue.  I would suggest if your child is old enough to no better not to eat it, send them with a travel size anti-bacterial gel/wipes.  Most teachers have some in their desks as well

It's not about 1 child being hygienic, it's about 100's of children being hygienic. I don't think anti-bacterial anything will prevent the exposure in young children. They touch walls, doors, slides, desks, chalk, etc so having only one child use the wipes would do no good.Isn't that like telling a child not to catch a cold at school? Adults can't even prevent colds, how do we expect children?

Not to sound pushy, but did you read my other journal?

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joani...
Jun. 3, 2008 at 9:46 PM I agree that it is important to protect all the children, especially if it is an issue of life or death.  I am just saying that to isolate a child because they have allergies is not fair to that child!  On the other hand banning peanut butter opens a whole other can of worms.  If it is a deathly allergy, then wouldnt anything that might contain peanuts be banned, or anything that might have been made on equipment with peanuts.  It is so far reaching that school districts would have to invest a lot of time (fine, if it will prevent a death) and money....and money is something that nearly all school districts lack.  At what point do we say ok, forgo new text books, learning equipment, teachers salaries in order to make a ban a reality?  I am not saying that it is something that shoulnt be done, I am just questioning the implementation of such a ban.

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Krist...
Jun. 3, 2008 at 9:47 PM

When I said if parent's taught their kids proper hygiene I was implying ALL parent's not just the parent's whose children have allergies.  Yes I read your other journal. I agree Education is the key however it is something you are unable to prevent.  If we ban peanuts in school for kids with peanut allergies then we'll have to ban fish for those with seafood allergies, and every other food for every other food allergy. 

Teaching your child what foods they should AVOID and WHY they should avoid them, as well as informing their teachers about their allergies and how to handle a situation in case the child goes into anaphylactic shock is the only thing you can do to help prevent against such incidents short of homeschooling. 

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arbro...
Jun. 3, 2008 at 9:55 PM

joaniedanger Jun. 3, 2008 at 6:46 PM (Delete)

If it is a deathly allergy, then wouldnt anything that might contain peanuts be banned, or anything that might have been made on equipment with peanuts.  It is so far reaching that school districts would have to invest a lot of time (fine, if it will prevent a death) and money....and money is something that nearly all school districts lack.  At what point do we say ok, forgo new text books, learning equipment, teachers salaries in order to make a ban a reality?

Typically, bans do not include "processed with" but simply ban peanuts and/or peanut butter - the two main culprits of an allergic reaction. There is actually extra aid when a ban takes place, so it's not taking away from any other aspect. 

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