ALG's Journal

You will be assimilated...

Okay, if you have a newborn you are exempt from this for the moment since newborn poo is runny.

THIS is  a toilet/john/crapper/commode/can/porcelin god:

Pretty isn't it?
It's where pee and poo go.   
If your sweet little one takes a doody in the disposable diaper, it also goes in there too.
It's easy!   Walk to the commode and dump the turd in.  If it gets stuck use a piece of toilet paper to gently coax it in.    (Oh, please, don't give me that ewww look.  You just got finished wiping your baby's butt AND you wipe your own tush after you defecate...hopefully anyway).   


THIS is a trash/garbage bin:

They come in many shapes and sizes.    Though you really should recycle your paper, glass, and cans  -- those items plus organic matter OTHER THAN human feces and dead pets (please give Tweetie a decent burial)  can go in it.   

Once you start solids or if your formula fed baby makes fairly solid poops, for the love of all that is good in this world, STOP throwing your diapers in the trash with solid poops!     EWWWW.    

 

Okay once more with feeling.

Poop in the poop chute.
Trash in the trash bin. 

 

Of course, I urge you to switch to cloth so that there aren't plastic diapers fluttering in the breeze in the landfills, but AT LEAST follow this poop rule!

And don't give me that lame-o excuse -- "its going to the landfill anyway", or "whats the big deal what about the pee?" -- you are just being lazy.    Pee can be forgiven since it is locked in the chemical gel.   Newborn runny poop and diahrhea forgiveable and understandable if using disposables.   Ideally all waste should go to sewagetreatment.   But we aren't talking about that are we?     We are talking about solid human waste and at least in a public place you are IN THE BATHROOM already.  How hard is it to throw the feces in the damn toilet?   Don't put feces in the trash.  Unless you are fine with just anyone take a dump in the dumpster, why do you think its okay to put a baby's obviously solid (albeit flattened) poop in there? 

http://www.apha.org/advocacy/policy/policysearch/default.htm?id=1189

American public health association

Health and Environmental Hazards of Disposable Diapers

Policy Date: 1/1/1989
Policy Number: 8910

The American Public Health Association,
Realizing that disposable diapers account for over three million tons or about 2 percent of the solid waste stream annually in the United States; 1 and
Recognizing that over 16 billion disposable diapers enter landfills in the US every year; 2 and
Knowing that the sales of adult incontinence products are rising to meet the needs of the elderly in the community and institutions; 2 and
Knowing that as landfill space decreases there is increasing emphasis placed on waste reduction and recycling; 1,4 and
Acknowledging that the World Health Organization advocates adequate disposal of human excreta; 5 and
Knowing that more than 100 different enteric viruses, including polio and hepatitis6 are known to be excreted in human feces and that these viruses can live for months after the stool has passed from the body; and
Realizing that the product labels instructing consumers to empty the feces into the toilet before disposing of the diaper are not commonly followed by consumers; 1 and
Knowing that human excreta entering the waste stream via disposable diapers pose potential health risks to sanitation workers and threaten to contaminate groundwater if landfills are not properly constructed; 7,8 therefore
1. Supports public education to educate consumers about diapering choices and their potential environmental consequences so that they can make an informed choice;
2. Supports consumer education so that if disposable diapers are used, the users dispose of them in a prudent manner so as to minimize the risk of disease transmission;
3. Supports research on the health implications of disposal of disposable diapers in the solid waste stream;
4. Encourages disposable diaper manufacturers to modify products to develop a recyclable product or one that generates less solid waste;
5. Encourages disposable diaper manufacturers to provide better instructions on the packaging about the proper disposal method of human excreta;
6. Urges manufacturers of disposable diapers to act responsibly in marketing their products; and
7. Supports research on the health, safety, and handling of various types of diapers (home-laundered, cloth diaper services, and disposable diapers) in day care settings in order to guide the development of standards for these settings.
References
1. Lehrburger C: Diapers in the Waste Stream: A Review of Waste Management and Public Policy Issues. Sheffield, MA: National Association of Diaper Services, 1988.
2. Hinds M: Do disposable diapers ever go away? New York Times December 10, 1988;33.
3. Williams M, Pannill F: Urinary incontinence in the elderly. Ann Intern Med 1982;97(6):895-907.
4. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Public Law 94-580. October 1976.
5. World Health Organization: Health for All. Geneva: WHO, 1987.
6. Ware SA: A Survey of Pathogen Survival during Municipal Solid Waste and Manure Treatment Processes. EPA Report 600/8-80-034. Washington, DC: Ebon Research Systems, 1980.
7. Peterson ML: Solid disposable diapers A potential source of viruses. Am J Public Health 1974;64:912-914.
8. Turnberg N: Human Infection Risks Associated with Infectious Disease Agents in the Waste Stream: A Literature Review. Olympia, WA: Washington State Department of Ecology, 1989.

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Comments:

unsus...
Feb. 27, 2010 at 4:47 PM

No offence but you fail to explai why ... the disposible diaper is going to the filth landfill anyway ... not sure why it matters what is or isn't still inside the diaper at that point.  Are we supposed to suck the pee out of it too?

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luvmy...
Feb. 27, 2010 at 5:08 PM

Yes, please explain why....... Is there an actual reason for it besides the fact its a garbage can? If not, thats why you use a pail for diapers!

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Chesh...
Feb. 27, 2010 at 5:15 PM

you don't have to worry about that from me. i use cloth diapers. poo always go in the toilet here.

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amile...
Feb. 27, 2010 at 5:18 PM

I can't believe people are questioning this:

http://www.apha.org/advocacy/policy/policysearch/default.htm?id=1189

American public health association

Health and Environmental Hazards of Disposable Diapers

Policy Date: 1/1/1989
Policy Number: 8910

The American Public Health Association,
Realizing that disposable diapers account for over three million tons or about 2 percent of the solid waste stream annually in the United States; 1 and
Recognizing that over 16 billion disposable diapers enter landfills in the US every year; 2 and
Knowing that the sales of adult incontinence products are rising to meet the needs of the elderly in the community and institutions; 2 and
Knowing that as landfill space decreases there is increasing emphasis placed on waste reduction and recycling; 1,4 and
Acknowledging that the World Health Organization advocates adequate disposal of human excreta; 5 and
Knowing that more than 100 different enteric viruses, including polio and hepatitis6 are known to be excreted in human feces and that these viruses can live for months after the stool has passed from the body; and
Realizing that the product labels instructing consumers to empty the feces into the toilet before disposing of the diaper are not commonly followed by consumers; 1 and
Knowing that human excreta entering the waste stream via disposable diapers pose potential health risks to sanitation workers and threaten to contaminate groundwater if landfills are not properly constructed; 7,8 therefore
1. Supports public education to educate consumers about diapering choices and their potential environmental consequences so that they can make an informed choice;
2. Supports consumer education so that if disposable diapers are used, the users dispose of them in a prudent manner so as to minimize the risk of disease transmission;
3. Supports research on the health implications of disposal of disposable diapers in the solid waste stream;
4. Encourages disposable diaper manufacturers to modify products to develop a recyclable product or one that generates less solid waste;
5. Encourages disposable diaper manufacturers to provide better instructions on the packaging about the proper disposal method of human excreta;
6. Urges manufacturers of disposable diapers to act responsibly in marketing their products; and
7. Supports research on the health, safety, and handling of various types of diapers (home-laundered, cloth diaper services, and disposable diapers) in day care settings in order to guide the development of standards for these settings.
References
1. Lehrburger C: Diapers in the Waste Stream: A Review of Waste Management and Public Policy Issues. Sheffield, MA: National Association of Diaper Services, 1988.
2. Hinds M: Do disposable diapers ever go away? New York Times December 10, 1988;33.
3. Williams M, Pannill F: Urinary incontinence in the elderly. Ann Intern Med 1982;97(6):895-907.
4. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Public Law 94-580. October 1976.
5. World Health Organization: Health for All. Geneva: WHO, 1987.
6. Ware SA: A Survey of Pathogen Survival during Municipal Solid Waste and Manure Treatment Processes. EPA Report 600/8-80-034. Washington, DC: Ebon Research Systems, 1980.
7. Peterson ML: Solid disposable diapers A potential source of viruses. Am J Public Health 1974;64:912-914.
8. Turnberg N: Human Infection Risks Associated with Infectious Disease Agents in the Waste Stream: A Literature Review. Olympia, WA: Washington State Department of Ecology, 1989.

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Imamo...
Feb. 27, 2010 at 5:51 PM

there actually are laws against human feces put in trash,  its biohazard waste, that our landfills are not equiped for, but our sewage system was made for (btw, diaper companies are supposed to notify folks to do this, usually it will say somewhere on the bag to drop the feces into the toilet)

Also, animal feces are not allowed in landfills (if one does use a landfill they are supposed to be highly sealed in a container, but even so, most localities do not want feces due to ground water contamination)

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tiny_...
Feb. 28, 2010 at 10:36 AM

'sposies are gross.. We cloth diaper here. Poop in the poop chute indeed! We hose ours right off the dipes and into the toilet!

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conej...
Feb. 28, 2010 at 11:13 AM

Interesting topic - I hope you continue to get readers & comments. Here, we don't support poop in the trash - or - in water-based flush systems, but I know we are a bit "fringe" having adopted compost toilets a long while back.  I was interested to read one of the replies that poop in the trash (human or animal) is illegal - hadn't personally come across that before - I sure know in most public parks you are expected to pick up your poop (presumably your pet's poop not your child's poop ;-) ) and deposit it into a trash can, usually encased in a pretty-printed plastic bag made just for that purpose and many parks don't provide specifically designated "poop recepticles", leaving me to wonder if they are following their own local laws (?).  Biologically speaking, discarded poops mixed with grass-clipping or shredded newsprint left to decompose above ground (in a contained area, yet still with a flow of fresh air) will do a better job of  breaking down all forms of poop to a pathogen-free status (in a year or less) than does landfill-burial or drowning in the municipal water system ... And stinks less than when driving past either of the two other municipal solutions. For further reading and to learn the science, the book "Humanure Handbook" by Joseph Jenkins can be bought or downloaded for free online at http://humanurehandbook.com/downloads/Humanure_Handbook_all.pdf .

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mtnma...
Feb. 28, 2010 at 11:21 AM

egads, honestly- this one never really occurred to me.. now I feel terrible... I really couldn't do cloth (rural- no dryer and no cooperation from hubby) and already feel guily about it.. my 8 yo still wears pullups every night.. that is not good either- but I do not really see an alternative there either..... what are we to do??...

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Chesh...
Feb. 28, 2010 at 11:54 AM

mtnmama111, i use gerbert's cloth training undies with their plastic undie covers for my 2 yr and my 4 year old.  they were wetting the bed but when they would wet the training it woke them up. now they are getting up on their own around midnight to go potty.  both the undies and plastic covers(don't dry in dryer) can be hung up and dried.

don't feel guilt if you can't do what you want to do because of certain situations.

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Mandi...
Feb. 28, 2010 at 5:23 PM

Oh my. I never thought of this. And I have 2 kids! I always just throw the diapers in the trashcan in the garage that way they don't smell. Hmm...

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