Carpet Cleaners. Carpet cleaners can be extremely toxic to children; who tend to play

and crawl around on carpets. The fumes given off by carpet cleaners can cause cancer

and liver damage. Carpet and upholstery cleaners accounted for 5397 poison exposures

in 2005. The majority of these, exposures, over 3500, involved children under 6. Source:

Annual Report of the American Association of Poison Control Centers' National Poisoning and Exposure

Database (2005).

Naphthalene



Possible human carcinogen found in moth balls and metal polishes.



Exposure to large amounts of napthalene may lead to hemolytic anemia.



Napthalene may cause nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, blood in the urine, and a

yellow color to skin.



Mice that breathed naphthalene vapors daily for a lifetime developed lung

tumors and some developed nose tumors.

Sources: Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (2005).

·

Bleach. The chemical known as hypochlorite in bleach causes more poisoning

exposures than any other household cleaning substance.

May cause reproductive,

endocrine, and immune system disorders.

Source: Annual Report of the American Association of

Poison Control Centers' National Poisoning and Exposure Database (2005).

·

Degreasers. Many degreasers contain petroleum distillates and butyl cellosolve; which

can damage lung tissues and dissolve fatty tissue surrounding nerve cells.

·

Drain Cleaners. One of the most hazardous products in the home, drain cleaners often

contain lye or sodium hydroxide; strong caustic substances that cause severe corrosive

damage to eyes, skin, mouth and stomach, and can be fatal if swallowed.

·

Glass Cleaners. Ammonia is found in many glass cleaners and the ammonia fumes can

irritate skin, eyes and the respiratory system. Ammonia based glass cleaners accounted

for 6,356 poison exposures in 2005.

Source: Annual Report of the American Association of Poison

Control Centers' National Poisoning and Exposure Database (2005).

Ammonia



Exposure to high levels of ammonia in air may be irritating to your skin, eyes,

throat, and lungs and cause coughing and burns.



Asthma sufferers may be more sensitive to breathing ammonia than others.



Swallowing concentrated solutions of ammonia can cause burns in your

mouth, throat, and stomach. Getting ammonia into the eyes can cause burns

and even blindness.

Sources: Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (2004); U.S. Department of Health

and Human Services, Public Health Service.

 

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