The last part of Dean's ARD paperwork!  :) 

Academic Performance

Due to Dean's young age and teacher reports of age appropriate skills, a less formal and more informal means of identifying academic skills was employed.

Dean was asked to write his name, write various letters, name the sounds of letters, read  2 short books and 3 lists of sight words, count a group of blocks, give a specific # of blocks when requested, complete a pattern of blocks, and match various related objects.

In terms of academic achievement, Dean appears to be developing age appropriate skills in reading, math, and writing (handwriting, that is). He reads sight words, can read grade level books at level 3, knows his alphabet and the sounds of the letters, counts past 20, adds with manipulatives, completes a pattern, and can match related objects with prompting.

In terms of reading comprehension, his verbal skills limit his ability to explain himself but he can use picture cues and point to respond to literal/factual questions.


Assistive Technology

Dean is able to access the curriculum without the need for assistive technology devices. Teachers do use picture cards and cues sometimes to offer choices and improve compliance.

Summary and Conclusions

Dean was referred for re-evaluation to determine continued eligibility for services and identify strengths and weaknesses.

Dean receives special education services as a student with Autism and a Speech Impairment. He receives instruction in a combination of general education and special education--spending blocks of time in each setting.

Observations of Dean suggest that he seems to move at his own pace. He engages in activities with little concern for time or what's socially demanded of him at the time. Dean appears to enjoy novel, interactive tasks; needs frequent redirection; struggles to keep his place on a page; is easily distracted; and tires easily or loses interest easily when task difficulty increases or novelty wears off.  He works much better in the mornings than in the afternoons when his focus is significantly reduced.

Cognitively Dean possesses strengths in non-verbal reasoning. He demonstrates deficits in verbal processing and word knowledge. In many instances he can tell or demonstrate the function of an object if he doesn't know the word.

In terms of academic achievement, Dean appears to be developing age appropriate skills in reading, math, and writing (handwriting, that is). He reads sight words, can read grade level books at level 3, knows his alphabet and the sounds of the letters, counts past 20, adds with manipulatives, completes a pattern, and can match related objects with prompting.

In terms of reading comprehension, his verbal skills limit his ability to explain himself but he can use picture cues and point to respond to literal/factual questions. 

Dean continues to demonstrate characteristics of Autism.

Recommendations

1. Continue providing services in a combination of special education and general education. As Dean's social skills improve and his study skills improve, he will need less support from special education. He possesses the cognitive skills needed to be successful.

Consideration of Special Education Criteria

AUTISM

Dean continues to demonstrate characteristics of Autism.

SPEECH IMPAIRMENT

Dean DOES continue to meet Alvin ISD eligibility criteria as a student with a Speech Impairment in the area of language.

Signature

The multidisciplinary team signatures ensure the following:

Tests and other evaluation materials used to assess the student were selected and administered so as not to be discriminatory on racial or cultural bases.

Tests and other evaluation materials used to assess the student were provided and administered in the student's native language or other mode of communication, unless it is clearly not feasible to do so.

Materials and procedures used to assess a student with limited English proficiency were selected and administered to ensure that they measure the extent to which the student has a disability and needs special education, rather than measuring the student's English language skills.

Any standardized tests that were given to a student were validated for the specific purpose for which they were used.

Any standardized tests that were given to a student were administered by trained and knowledgeable personnel in accordance with any instructions provided by the producers of the tests.

If a test was administered to a student with impaired sensory, manual, or speaking skills, the test results accurately reflect the student's aptitude or achievement level or whatever other factors the test purports to measure, rather than reflecting the students impaired sensory, manual or speaking skills (unless those skills are the factors that the test purports to measure).

The evaluation is sufficiently comprehensive to identify all of the special education needs and related (supportive) services as are required to assist a student with a disability to benefit from special education, whether or not they are commonly linked to the disability category in which the student has been classified.

____________________________________

_Licensed Specialist in School Psychology

Gena Reine, Ph.D.

Position

Concur with findings: __x_Yes  ___No

 



____________________________________

________________________

Denise Bostick

Position

Concur with findings: ___Yes  ___No

 



____________________________________

________________________

Julie Welch

Position

Concur with findings: ___Yes  ___No

 



Statement of non-concurring team member's conclusions:

Team Member: __________________________________
Conclusions:

About Test Scores

Test scores are estimates of the attribute measured by the test. The accuracy of test scores depends on numerous factors, such as the following:

Student's feelings about being tested

Familiarity with standard English

Cultural differences

Conditions of the testing setting

Mental or physical restrictions

Used properly, test scores are combined with other relevant information to assist with decisions about the student's needs. Scores from a single test should never be used to identify abnormal functioning, or in any way limit participation in the general educational program.

When test scores are placed on common scale, or standardized, direct comparisons can be made among them.

For Standard Scores (SS) the average is 100, with 90 to 110 often considered the average range. For Scaled Scores (ScS) the average is 10 and the average range is often from 8 to 12.

The Percentile is based on the Standard and Scaled Scores and provides an estimate of the percentage of students in your child's age range or grade in school that, if tested, would earn lower scores. The average Percentile is 50 and the average range is usually considered to be between the 25th and 75th percentile.

Ranges of Standard and Scaled Scores in this report are described using various sets of terms chosen by the author or publisher of each test. The following is an example of one such system of descriptors:

Scaled Score

Standard Score

Percentile

Descriptor

17 to 20

131 and above

98 and above

Very Superior

15 to 16

121 to 130

92 to 98

Superior

13 to 14

111 to 120

77 to 91

High Average

8 to 12

90 to 110

25 to 75

Average

6 to 7

80 to 89

9 to 23

Low Average

4 to 5

70 to 79

2 to 8

Below Average

1 to 3

69 and below

2 and below

Well Below Average


T-scores, with an average of 50 and a typical average range of 40 to 60, make up another type of standardized score. T-scores are most often used with behavior rating scales.

The behaviors most often measured by T-scores are either: 'adaptive' (for example, Social Skills), where high scores are desirable and low scores suggest need for improvement; or 'clinical', where high scores may indicate a problem needing to be addressed and lower scores are considered normal or desirable.

Since Percentiles are not always based directly on T-scores, they are not included in the following table. This table shows a sample system of descriptors that might be used for adaptive and clinical scores:

Adaptive Scales:

Clinical Scales:

T-score range

Descriptor 

T-score range

Descriptor

70 and above

Very High 

70 and above

Clinically Significant

60 to 69

High 

60 to 69

At-Risk

41 to 59

Average 

41 to 59

Average

31 to 40

At-Risk 

31 to 40

Low

30 and below

Clinically Significant 

30 and below

Very Low


Graphs provide a convenient way to help understand scores and to compare them from test to test. In this report, all standardized scores from Behavior/Social-Emotional ratings are converted to, and graphed as, T-scores. All other categories of score are converted to, and graphed as, Standard Scores.

Add A Comment

Comments:

Sandr...
Dec. 29, 2011 at 1:49 AM

Hello Michelle:

I was reading Dean's report and must say that my son Josh had some similar symptoms and today he is fine. I had mentioned how Immunocal had helped Josh so much that Josh is 10 this year and show now signs or symptoms of Autism/Add and I am so grateful that some recommended this product to me because as time went on if left untreated it does not get any better as these kids need to detox from the mercury, heavy metals and toxins. You can google Immunocal on the internet and if you would be interested you can email me at asha.persaud@gmail.com as you have to give Immunocal time to work in your system but it really pays off.  Thanks for listening.

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